VOIDED CONCRETE SLABS
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One Wall Street

Re-purposing a Manhattan Classic

 

Outwardly historic, this treasure gains new life from an internal makeover.

 

PROJECT VOIDED SLAB ACHIEVEMENTS:

  • Enabled a major renovation within an existing historic building

  • Produced a 223 ton dead load reduction on existing columns

  • Enabled a concrete frame, favored for residential use


One Wall Street is well known but its purpose has been evolving. In 1907, an 18-story office tower known as the "Chimney Building” rose at One Wall Street in the Financial District. In 1929, the building was purchased for $1.05 million and demolished to make way for American Exchange Irving Trust’s plans to create a massive frontage along Broadway that ran down an entire block of Wall Street.

The next One Wall Street building was completed in 1931 and designed by Ralph Walker, who is considered to be one of the best American architects of the 20th century. The Art Deco architecture was as iconic then as it remains today, with a steel skeleton covered in limestone that rises above Lower Manhattan to be a central figure in the skyline. A 36-floor addition was completed in 1965 to add more office space to the south part of the tower.

In 2014, the building was acquired by Harry Macklowe and Macklowe Properties with plans to remake the office tower into a residential and retail complex. A design team that includes SLCE Architects and DeSimone Consulting Engineers have re-envisioned interior spaces to accommodate a new future for this iconic building. While new apartments and amenities are at the center of changes at One Wall Street, the exterior and structure of the building are also getting upgrades that still retain much of its original charm and iconography. A new Broadway entrance will include an undulating canopy that plays on the building’s limestone facade and is actually based on a design from Walker that never came to exist. They also saved items from a bank previously located in the building, such as vault doors, that have been re-purposed throughout the interior.

Inside, the retrofitting and renovations have meant making plenty of changes as well. One of the biggest updates is taking many of the older elements from the original building and combining them with the newer tower portion. Since the tower is a landmark, most of the larger changes are taking place on the annex side, including the addition of a glass-laden entrance for the retailers below. Whole Foods and Life Time Fitness are two anchor tenants who have already signed on for the building’s grand opening in 2020.

Inside, the building will eventually house 560 luxury condos, ranging from studios to four-bedrooms. The biggest apartment will be a 12,965 square-foot, top-floor triplex penthouse that consists of living space, four bedrooms, four baths, a library, dining room, chef’s kitchen, and full-floor living area. A 381-square-foot terrace will protrude from the top level.

 
Creating New Space Within  — Voided concrete slabs enable new uses within the existing structure.

Creating New Space Within — Voided concrete slabs enable new uses within the existing structure.

 
 
Hidden Opportunity  — Voided concrete slabs are helping to transform the use of this historic building without disturbing its unique and familiar facade.

Hidden Opportunity — Voided concrete slabs are helping to transform the use of this historic building without disturbing its unique and familiar facade.

Adaptable From The Start  — Voided concrete slabs accommodate the complexities now common in construction without costly system customization.

Adaptable From The Start — Voided concrete slabs accommodate the complexities now common in construction without costly system customization.

Easy to Install and Inspect  — These concrete void formers quickly and systematically assemble and place, allowing for reliable quality controls.

Easy to Install and Inspect — These concrete void formers quickly and systematically assemble and place, allowing for reliable quality controls.


ARCHITECT:      

  • SLCE Architects, LLP

ENGINEER:       

  • DeSimone Consulting Engineers, PLLC

BUILDERS: 

  • Broad Construction